Health Benefits of Tea Tree Essential Oil

Health Benefits of Tea Tree Essential Oil

The health benefits of Tea Tree Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties as an antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antiviral, balsamic, cicatrisant, expectorant, fungicide, insecticide, stimulant and sudorific substance.

Unlike the name suggests, the essential oil of Tea Tree is not extracted from the plant commonly associated with tea as a beverage. Neither is it related to Tea Oil, which is extracted from the seed of the Tea plant. Instead, it is extracted through steam distillation of twigs and leaves of Tea Tree, which has the botanical name Melaleuca Alternifolia. The tea tree is native to Southeast Queensland and New South Wales, in Australia, which is why it is such a common and popular essential oil in that country. However, its impressive qualities have spread to other parts of the world, so it can no be found internationally.

The main constituents of Tea Tree essential oil are Alpha Pinene, Beta Pinene, Sabinene, Myrcene, Alpha Phellandrene, Alpha Terpinene, Limonene, Cineole, Gamma Terpinene, Para Cymene, Terpinolene, Linalool, Terpinenol and Alpha Terpineol. This tree is native to Australia and its oil has been used and known among the original inhabitants of that continent as a cure-all medicine since ancient times.

The reputation as a cure-all given to this oil is not an exaggeration. Tea tree oil can be used as a cure for almost all tropical infections and diseases. You name it and it has some sort of positive effect or treatment for that disease. It is invariably found in almost the households of Australia, particularly those that have small children. The magical healing and disinfectant properties make it a wonder drug that also boosts your immunity. However, it is not meant to be ingested, and is poisonous. It is meant for topical application only!

There is so much more to tea tree essential oil than a boosted immune system and a protective agent for your skin; let’s explore some of those other invaluable health benefits below.

Health Benefits of Tea Tree Essential Oil

tea tree essential oilAntibacterial: It is said that when Mother Nature creates a diseases, she also creates the cure. The activity of microbes, bacteria, viruses and fungi are at their peak in the Tropics, so most of the medicinal plants to treat those dangerous things are found there too. Tea tree is one such plant. It can cure some of the most horrible and dangerous bacterial infections found in the tropics. Wounds, which are prone to contracting bacterial infections in this region, can be effectively cured and protected using this oil. This oil is seldom taken orally, but if you do, it should be in mild concentrations. It can cure internal bacterial infections such as those in the colon, stomach, intestines, excretory system and urinary system. It can also be used in treatment of tuberculosis.

Balsamic: The essential oil of Tea tree has balsamic properties that generally boost health. It promotes the absorption of nutrients from food and gives protection from diseases as well, meaning that overall it is a positive addition to our lives.

Cicatrisant: The Cicatrisant property of this essential oil makes it heal wounds quickly and protects them from infections. Furthermore, it can help neutralize or diminish the scar marks and after spots left by eruptions, boils, pox, and acne.

Antimicrobial: Microbes don’t stand a chance against this oil, since it is a highly effective antimicrobial substance. It can kill and keep away certain microbes (protozoa) which are responsible for causing severe tropical fevers and malaria.

Antiviral: Viral infections are very hazardous and are frequently recurring, since viruses can survive under very harsh conditions. They can bear unimaginable heat, cold and even poison, because they develop a protective shell called a “Cyst” around them. Some viruses are intelligent enough to develop a new cyst each time they are activated, like the Common Cold Virus, in order to trick our immune system. They never die naturally and can live dormant (neither alive or dead) for hundreds or even thousands of years. They can be killed only if their cyst is ruptured using a particular compound or if they are subjected to extreme heat which is beyond their tolerance. The Tea Tree Oil helps rupture this cyst in some viruses and can give protection against them. It also helps cure viral infections like the common cold, influenza, mumps, measles, and pox.

Expectorant: People who are suffering from cough and cold, congestion, bronchitis and other troubles associated with colds, are sure to get relief using tea tree essential oil. It provides relief from cough, cold, bronchitis and congestion. It can be rubbed on the chest and inhaled while sleeping, or a drop can be placed on the pillow so it can do its magical work at night, and you can wake up feeling much better in the morning.

Hair Care: The stimulant property of tea tree essential oil can be very beneficial for taking care of certain hair conditions. If you suffer from dandruff or hair loss, simply apply a diluted amount of tea tree essential oil to your scalp. The increased blood flow that you experience will help your follicle stay healthy and strengthen the hold on your hair, so you won’t suffer from premature hair loss. Also, since the skin will become healthier, it will be easier to keep moisturized, reducing the amount of dandruff and dry skin!

Insecticide: It is obvious that an essential oil that is so deadly for bacteria and viruses will be effective against insects as well. Tea tree oil is an efficient insect deterrent and insect killer. It does not let parasites and other insects like mosquitoes, fleas, lice, or flies come near someone who has rubbed some of this oil on their body. It kills internal insects and worms too, such as intestinal worms like round worms, tape worms, and hook worms, because it can be absorbed by your body and skin.

Antiseptic: Open wounds are the most susceptible place to infection by bacteria and fungi and may result in sepsis or tetanus. Thus they must be protected well in advance.Tea tree oil can be a wise preventative choice as it is an excellent antiseptic. It can be applied directly on the wounds, boils, sores, cuts or certain eruptions, including insect bites and stings, to protect them from infections. It is as good as any antibiotic, but without any of their adverse side effects.

Stimulant: This essential oil has a stimulating effect on hormone secretions, blood circulation, and most importantly, on the immune system. It boosts immunity and acts as a shield against many different types of infections. That is why it is quite popular in aromatherapy, because not only does it blend well with many other oils, it can also provide you with internal benefits that would otherwise be impossible, since you are not allowed to ingest tea tree essential oil.

tea tree essential oilSudorific: Besides infections, another cause of disease is an accumulation of toxins in the body. These toxins are generated by the body itself, formed as a by-product of various reactions, or they get inside the body in some way. Our body has certain mechanisms to eliminate these toxins. One of them is perspiration or sweating, which has the its advantages, including removing toxins, moistening the skin, opening pores on the skin and keeping the body cool. Tea tree essential oil, being a sudorific substance, increases sweating and promotes the removal of toxins like uric acid. It also helps remove excess water and salts from the body, while cleaning the pores. This further prevents the occurrence of acne, for which tea tree essential oil is often recommended.

Fungicide: The Tea Tree Essential Oil is as effective against fungal infections as it is against any bacterial or microbial infections. It inhibits fungal growth and cures diseases like dermatitis and Athlete’s Foot. Although internal fungal infections can be very dangerous, and even deadly, never ingest tea tree oil, even in extremely diluted forms, as it is toxic. Other herbal remedies for fungal infections can be used that are far safer for internal infections.

Other Benefits: Tea tree essential oil can provide relief from muscular pain, aches, and sprains because its strong chemical properties can work as an anti-inflammatory and also encourage blood flow to a specific area (being a stimulant), which speeds up the healing process and increases the rate of new tissue and cellular growth.

A Few Words of Caution: Although there are no inherent risks of topically applying tea tree oil, in some rare cases, people may be overly sensitive to the oil, as a form of a minor allergenic. However, there have been numerous reports of people who accidentally consume tea tree oil, and this should be strictly avoided. The side effects of consuming tea tree essential oil can be quite serious, and they include confusion, hallucinations, drowsiness, coma, unsteadiness, severe rashes, vomiting, diarrhea, general weakness, stomach upset, blood cell abnormalities. This should always be kept away from pets and children.

Blending: This Essential Oil blends well with Cinnamon, Clary Sage, Clove, Geranium, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Nutmeg, Rosewood, Rosemary and Thyme essential oils.

What is the Best Face Cream for Men?

What is the Best Face Cream for Men?

First we should ask is a man’s skin really different from a woman’s?

Besides having facial hair, there are structural differences between a man’s skin and a woman’s. Androgen (testosterone) stimulation causes an increase in skin thickness, which accounts for why a man’s skin is about 25% thicker than a woman’s. In addition to being thicker, a man’s skin texture is tougher.Sebum (oil) and its production also differ. After puberty, sebum production is greater in males than females, which is attributed to androgen secretions and accounts for why men have longer lasting acne.Regardless of age, men also have a higher collagen density than women. Because collagen content is directly related to the signs of skin aging, it has been said a woman’s skin is about 15 years older than a man’s of the same age. However, men are less sun savvy than women, meaning they don’t use sunscreens, and could contribute to why the “15 year” skin age difference is not readily noticed. UV damage from the sun can add years to a man’s skin and negate the benefit of slowed intrinsic aging.

What ingredients make up the best face cream for men?

Best Face Cream for Men

When it comes to face moisturizers, the choices are seemingly endless. Drugstores and high-end department stores are packed with creams, moisturizers, serums and more—all promising everything from younger-looking skin to a blemish-free complexion. But what makes one moisturizer different from another? It all comes down to its ingredients.

Packed with any number of substances (and preservatives and additives), not all moisturizers are created equal. Many people rarely check the ingredients label on their beauty products. And it’s no wonder— reading the ingredient list of your favorite beauty product can be downright confusing. It’s usually packed with unpronounceable names that don’t make sense to the common consumer. And opting for the most expensive bottle isn’t your best bet – they may simply contain hard-to-get, but ineffective ingredients. To help you cut through the confusion, we talked to dermatologists to come up with the top five ingredients you should look for in your moisturizer. They’ll help you save face and reveal your softest, smoothest skin yet.

Dimethicone

Best Face Cream for Men

Pronounced “dye-METH-i-kone”, this ingredient may be found in many skin care, makeup and hair care products. Manufacturers use it in moisturizers, primers and foundations because it helps fill in uneven texture and fine lines, creating a smooth, flawless look. “Dimethicone is the main ingredient in most oil-free moisturizers,” says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. “It’s a light emollient that forms a protective layer over the skin’s surface, helping to hydrate and keep moisture in.” Emollients, like petrolatum, lanolin, and mineral oil, soften and moisturize the skin and can also decrease flaking [Source: WebMD]. They do this by creating an oily layer on top of the skin that traps water.

Petrolatum

If you’ve ever used Vaseline, you’re probably familiar with petrolatum (aka, petroleum jelly). Derived from petroleum (the same kind used for gasoline and other products such as deodorant), petroleum jelly is a staple in many people’s medicine cabinets—and for good reason. It’s great for smoothing and protecting rough skin. “Petrolatum is an occlusive ingredient that prevents water loss and an emollient that hydrates the rough dead cells on the skin’s surface,” says Zeichner. If you have dry skin, be sure to look for petrolatum on a product’s ingredients list. Folks with normal to oily skin may want to skip petrolatum, though, as it may exacerbate greasy skin.

Hyaluronic Acid

Hyaluronic acid has been getting a lot of buzz in the beauty world lately. Because of its ability to plump and soften skin, it’s been showing up in moisturizers and serums over the last few years. Unlike some other skin care ingredients, hyaluronic acid is actually already present in the human body [Source: WebMD]. A viscous, gooey substance, it helps lubricate joints and is even found in the fluid of eyeballs to help maintain their shape [Source: WebMD]. However, like many substances in our bodies, it naturally depletes as we age—which is why beauty product manufacturers have begun adding it to products. “Hyaluronic acid is a humectant that hydrates by drawing water in to the outer layers from deep within the skin,” says Zeichner. In fact, it is said to hold up to 1,000 times its weight in water. As a result, it makes skin appear plumper and feel softer and smoother. That may be why it’s often used as a lip filler in plastic surgery!

Glycerin

Also known as glycerol, glycerin is a humectant that works similarly to hyaluronic acid, says Zeichner. Composed of fats and sugars, it’s a sweet-tasting lipid that’s actually found in all fats, whether they are from animals or vegetables [Source: Paula’s Choice]. Because glycerin is a humectant, it readily absorbs and retains water, keeping skin sooth and hydrated. It attracts water from the environment and from the lower layers of skin (aka, the dermis) adding moisture to the surface layers of skin (the epidermis). In general, it helps maintain the skin’s outer barrier, which helps prevent dryness and flaking. One recent study found that after 10 days of treatment with a cream that was 20 percent glycerin, volunteers saw an increase in corneometer values, a measurement used to measure the hydration levels of your skin [International Journal of Cosmetic Science].

Ceramides

Ceramides are fats naturally found in the skin’s outer layer, and they make up a major component of skin structure. For this reason, they are crucial for maintaining the skin’s natural moisture barrier. “Just like a house is composed of bricks, your skin is made up of cells,” says Zeichner. “Ceramides serve as the mortar between the skin cell ‘bricks’ holding it all together.” In fact, studies have linked dry, damaged skin to low ceramide levels [Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology]. In addition to causing dry, scaly skin, a lack of ceramides makes the skin more susceptible to environmental factors like dirt, pollution and other irritants.

 

So there you have it, that is the best face cream for men.

What Can Aloe Vera Really do for Acne?

What Can Aloe Vera Really do for Acne?

aloe vera acne

The association between aloe vera and skincare is nothing new-people have been using it to treat everything from sunburns to eczema for centuries now. However, is this plant extract also a good addition for acne prone skin? The answer is a bit of a mixed bag.

First and foremost, it’s important to remember that aloe vera cannot really cure your acne on its own. The only solution for permanently stopping breakouts is addressing the problem at its root. However, that being said, aloe can work as a wonderful supplemental product for certain acne-related issues.  In its pure form, it’s a non-comedogenic moisturizer with anti- inflammatory properties.

A Little About Aloe Vera

Aloe vera has been around for a very long time-the earliest records of it come from ancient Egypt over 6000 years ago! They called it “the plant of immortality” and used it both medicinally and as a gift for pharaohs. Needless to say, since then, aloe has been a popular ingredient in all sorts of herbal remedies and beauty products.

Aloe is classified as a succulent plant and is primarily cultivated today for its leaves that contain a gooey gel-which is used in a number of skincare and other health products. The plant is grown worldwide, and its popularity only continues to rise.

Aloe Vera and Acne

When it comes to acne sufferers, there are a couple different ways that aloe can help with breakouts. First of all, you should be interested in aloe’s healing properties. It’s commonly used as a remedy for sunburns or minor cuts and scrapes, but it’s also great for addressing the problem of acne scars. Aloe has a natural exfoliating effect that helps remove dead skins cells from the scarring site and it also promotes the healing and regeneration of damaged cells by increasing your body’s collagen production. Collagen is one of the essential building blocks of skin, and the more your body creates the less noticeable scarring will be. Aloe also works as a softening and moisturizing agent.

In addition to making acne scars less visible, aloe is also beneficial for its anti-inflammatory and redness reducing properties. While these properties won’t cure your acne, they will help minimize the visible symptoms and offer some protection against future outbreaks.

Finally, aloe vera is also quite high in vitamin A. This is an essential nutrient that helps your body naturally remove its dead skin cells. Dead cells left on the skin can cause clogged pores that create a breeding ground for acne-causing bacteria, so anything that can help the exfoliation process will be a benefit to you.

aloe vera acne

Using Aloe Vera

Aloe vera comes in several different forms these days. The most natural choice would be to use the gel straight from the plant’s leaves. This gel can be applied directly to acne scars once a day to help reduce their appearance. You may use the gel on unaffected skin as well, but keep in mind this might not be effective. Aloe has difficulty penetrating the upper layers of healthy skin, which means that any potential health benefits it could have will be lessened. However, you may still find that is has a temporary but pleasing moisturizing effect.

There are many skincare products on the market these days that contain aloe vera gel or extracts. When using things like this, it’s important to be a smart consumer. Check the label to see what other ingredients have been added to the product-unfortunately, you may find that it’s full of harsh, less-than-natural chemicals that can negate any of the potential benefits the aloe would have on your skin.

Aloe vera juice is another increasingly popular trend. Drinking the juice from this plant will probably not be as effective as topical applications for reducing acne scars, but it does have other applications. It’s a great way to absorb aloe’s vitamin A and all the exfoliating benefits that come along with it. However, keep in mind that, like other juices, producers of aloe juice may add unhealthy ingredients into the mix-like extra refined sugar for sweetness.  So make sure you sure only use PURE aloe products  to amplify your benefits.

Skin Health First

skin health

“At Last – Fat That You and Your Skin Can Love”

In our society a simple 3-letter word “fat” grew to become a notorious villain. The fact is however, that to live a healthy life and… to show off your beautiful complexion we need to recognize the “good” from the “ugly”. I hope the short story below will help you in this process.

Eating right means diet with no fat – RIGHT? WRONG!

Eating the RIGHT kinds of fat is essential for optimal health as well as good skin tone. Most of our diet is full of too much saturated fat and not enough of the essential fats that we call essential oils. The essential oils are those that promote clear and healthy skin and are also good for your heart.

Saturated and mono-unsaturated fats are not necessary in your diet; the polyunsaturated fats or oils are essential for your health and to maintain youthful, radiant and healthy looking skin.

The polyunsaturated oils provide two essential fats: Omega 6 (linoleic acid) and Omega 3 (alpha-linoleic acid). If these essential fatty acids are processed using heat (as fried and cooked or baked at high temperatures) they change to trans-fats and liberate free radicals which can damage skin and local tissues. These transformed fats are not good for us and interfere with liver metabolism, increase the likelihood of heart disease and inhibit our immune system. So avoid processed or fried foods, which change the structure of these essential fatty acids (EFA).

The body cannot manufacture EFA, so they must be supplied by the diet. EFA are necessary for the proper functioning of all tissues and for tissue repair, especially the skin since the EFAs hold skin cells together in a water tight seal and retain moisture.

The best source of EFA is fish (among the best is salmon and herring) and flaxseeds (linseed). Also a diet high in nuts and seeds, especially walnuts and pumpkin seeds will help to supply the necessary EFAs. Taking Omega 3, as a supplement such as cod-liver oil will help to support the proper function of the brain, vision, facilitate learning and prevent mood swings. These oils also help to control blood cholesterol, improve immunity, reduce inflammation (also in skin), moisten dry skin and support the body’s water metabolism.

Omega 3 (alpha-linoleic acid) is converted by the body into gamma-linoleic acid (GLA) and may then proceed to the pathway responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandins. These prostaglandins keep blood thin (inhibit platelet aggregation), lower blood pressure, aid water metabolism, decrease inflammation, improve nerve and immune function and help to balance blood sugar. This group of fats is present in seeds and their oils. The best source of seed oils are pumpkin, hemp, sunflower, safflower, sesame, corn, walnut, soybean and wheatgerm oil. Evening primrose oil and borage oil are the best-known sources of Gamma-linoleic acid and may be taken as supplements.

Both these two fats Omega 6 and Omega 3 (linoleic and alpha-linoleic acid) are essential for healthy skin since they work together to keep skin smooth and soft and help the cells to retain the appropriate amount of water. Adequate EFAs also help to reduce the dehydrating effects of heat, wind and other environmental factors. If you have a deficiency of EFA the health of your skin deteriorates, the skin becomes dehydrated, itchy, dry and inflamed and you will be more prone to skin infections.

EFAs help wounds to heal more quickly (acne scars), strengthen capillary walls and prevent enlargement of sebaceous glands that in turn may become over active resulting in a higher chance for acne. EFA also help to balance hormones and increase blood flow to the skin.

To ensure an adequate intake of EFA in the diet eat plenty of fish, nuts, seeds and their oils. Have seeds ground up and sprinkled on your salads or into your cereals, even dip your fish or meat into the oil extracts. Make sure the nuts, seeds and oils are stored in air-tight containers to prevent them from turning rancid and producing damaging trans-fats. You may also take an EFA supplement.

USE THE “GOOD FATS” TO FEED YOUR SKIN

EVENING PRIMROSE MASK

This mask nourishes skin and reduces inflammation. It can be used for all skin types but is especially good for dry, skin or acne damaged, scarred and sensitive skin. Evening primrose is rich in gamma linoleic acid and contains all the therapeutic properties of the essential fatty acids; and helps rebalance sebaceous secretions. Use the mask one a week or as desired.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons all natural, plain yogurt
  • Potato starch
  • 2 capsules of evening primrose oil
  • Water
  • 1 teaspoon of honey (organic if possible)
  • 2 capsules of vitamin E
  • Rosewater (may be bought in natural food stores as rosehydrolat). This is to be used after the mask

Open the capsules of evening primrose and vitamin E and place the oils in a bowl. Add all the other ingredients except the rosewater. Add enough water to make a good mask consistency. The paste should be the consistency of chocolate icing on a cake, easy to spread but not “leaky”. Apply the mask to a clean face and neck and leave to absorb for 20 minutes. Relax.

Rinse off with warm water and pat-dry delicately preferably with a cotton towel. Finish by toning your skin with light floral water such as rosewater. Discard any remaining mask and make a fresh batch for each treatment.

6 Beauty Supplements You Haven’t Heard Of

beauty supplements

Beauty Supplements

There is a present plenitude of beauty supplements these days and with scores of recommendations it becomes difficult to tell the signal from the noise.  Fear not, there are indeed supplements that can take years off your appearance, but more importantly the supplements that make you look more vibrant are also those that make you more vigorous.  If you want to feel healthier and fitter, read on.

beauty supplements

For sun protection

Try: Fern Extract

Aside from regularly using sunscreen, you can protect yourself from harmful UV rays by taking a potent antioxidant supplement such as Heliocare. Research from the University of Miami School of Medicine indicates that the fern extract in these pills significantly reduced UVA-related DNA damage that leads to wrinkling and brown spots by up to 80%. For best results, pop one each day starting a week before you plan on fun in the sun. “This allows the antioxidants to build up in your system for maximum protection,” says Leslie Baumann, MD, a Miami Beach-based dermatologist and sunburn specialist.

beauty supplements

To stop nail breakage

Try: Biotin

A daily 2.5 mg dose of the B vitamin biotin in good for swimmers or in the summer months when you’re in the water more often. “This supplement helps prevent breakage from too much exposure to salt and chlorine,” says Jin Soon Choi, owner of Jin Soon Natural Hand and Foot Spas. Research shows that a daily dose of the nutrient increases nail thickness by 25%, making nails less apt to split and tear.

beauty supplements

To reverse skin damage

Try: Idebenone

It may be hard to pronounce, but idebenone (eh-DE-be-known) spells younger-looking skin. The antioxidant is small enough to penetrate deep into skin to repair damaged cells, says David McDaniel, MD, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology at Eastern Virginia Medical School. Taken daily, Idebenone defends your skin’s health from the inside out.  I started taking it, but not for my skin.  Apparently it’s a potent catalyst of mitochondrial energy production.  Who doesn’t need more energy?

beauty supplements

For healthier skin, hair & nails

Try: Primrose & Black Currant Oil

“Consider supplementing with gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a fat that helps promote healthy skin, hair, and nails and is very hard to come by in the diet,” says Prevention advisor Andrew Weil, MD, clinical professor of medicine at the University of Arizona. “The best sources of GLA are evening primrose oil and black currant oil; take 500 mg of either twice a day and expect to use them for 6 to 8 weeks before you see results.”  GLA is the central component of skin lipids, without it your skin will be wan and saggy.

beauty supplements

For stronger nails

Try: Flax Seed

Omega-3 fatty acids are also important for nail health,” says Weil. “Eat a few more weekly servings of omega-rich flaxseed, walnuts, and oily, cold-water fish like salmon, mackerel, and sardines, or take daily supplements with 2 to 3 g of fish oil to get a combined 1 g of EPA and DHA.”  I love throwing flaxseed in my juice or oatmeal.  There are many creative ways to incorporate legumes with good omega fatty acids.

beauty supplements

For firm, smooth skin

Try: Imedeen Prime Renewal

The idea that a biomarine-based complex can shore up aging skin may sound a little fishy, but the evidence is impressive, says Baumann. Postmenopausal women taking the supplement (which is recommended for those age 50 and up) saw significant improvement in skin firmness and smoothness in a 6-month study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition—and the results were seen on the face, d’colletage, and hands. Likewise, in a similar 12-week study on women taking a sister supplement (Imedeen Time Perfection, suggested for women 35 to 50), skin’s moisture content increased by 30%. Other changes include a visible reduction in fine lines, a fading of sunspots, and an overall brighter complexion.

The contents of the Imedeen capsules—which contain a proprietary protein derived from a deep-sea fish and high concentrations of antioxidants such as vitamin C and lycopene—work in part by increasing production of collagen and elastin, as well as hyaluronic acid, the body’s natural moisturizer, says Imedeen’s Lars Lindmark, PhD. Take the Imedeen supplement suggested for your age, advises Baumann, who uses Time Perfection herself and recommends it to patients. Although a 90-day supply of Prime Renewal ($265) is significantly more expensive than Time Perfection ($195; both at imedeen.us), the dosage supplies twice the amount of the biomarine complex.

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