What Can Kigelia Fruit Extract Do for Your Skin?

What Can Kigelia Fruit Extract Do for Your Skin?

kigelia fruit extract

Kigelia africana has been cultivated throughout sub-Saharan Africa, trees of the kigelia africana and kigelia pinnata plants yield a large sausage-like fruit that the region’s indigenous peoples have used for medicinal and cosmetic applications since time immemorial. Many cosmetic companies have acknowledged the fruit’s dermis-improving properties through the addition of fruit extract to some of their products. Medical research has also uncovered evidence that kigelia fruit extract may be effective in helping to treat melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Kigelia Fruit Extract has Antibacterial Properties

Pursuing up on studies that will showed this stem bark from the kigelia africana pressed strong antibacterial qualities, the team connected with Southern African experts executed a report to discover when the kigelia berries offered these gains as well. Many people well prepared elementary removes connected with the two stem bark along with berries applying distilled normal water, ethanol or ethyl acetate. Research workers after that examined this removes against gram-negative along with gram-positive bacterias. Within a document on the studies inside a 2002 matter from the “South African Log connected with Botany, ” they reported stem bark along with berries removes showed major antibacterial activity against the two strains connected with bacterias. These kinds of studies have provided just how regarding using kigelia remove inside skin-cleansing agents and also other products meant to overcome microbial epidermis microbe infections.

Kigelia Fruit Extract Helps Tighten Skin

A five-member Indian staff of people began a review of your controlled literature spanning reports directly into kigelia’s healing along with cosmeceutical components. Into their record, printed within a the year just gone problem of “Natural Item Radiance” — identified within 2011 because the “Indian Log of Pure Products along with Resources” — that they specified reports which located kigelia’s active ingredients include steroidal saponins plus the flavonoids luteolin along with quercetin. Most of these phytochemicals aid bolster along with stabilize your collagen fibres which service skin, therefore creating a toning influence. Some reports located the remove seemed to be specially successful within toning skin near your chests.

Kigelia Fruit Extract Fights Skin Cancer

Research workers within North Ireland in europe done an within vitro review to be able to assess the potential of varied compounds from your kigelia pinnata fresh fruit to halt your spread regarding human most cancers cellular material. Part of the traction for the review was the original use of your fresh fruit by simply people healers to take care of skin cancer as well as other skin disorders. Scientists isolated numerous compounds from your kigelia fresh fruit in addition to analyzed these individuals next to most cancers cellular material inside research. They discovered major anti-cancer attributes coming from a number of kigelia compounds, such as isocoumarins demethylkigelin in addition to kigelin; oleic in addition to heneicosanoic fat; ferulic p; as well as the furonaphthoquinone 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)naphtho[2, 3-b]furan-4, 9-dione. In their conclusions, published in a 2010 problem regarding “Planta Medica, ” analysts noted how the furonaphthoquinone was likewise useful within vitro next to a pair of pressures regarding busts cancer cellular material.

Kigelia Fruit Extract has Other Benefits Too

With it is writeup on the actual materials addressing kigelia’s cosmeceutical applications, the actual writers in the the year just gone “Natural Solution Radiance” post claimed kigelia had been popular just as one component in a range of aesthetic supplements. They can grant skin a easier visual appeal by means of reducing fine collections and wrinkle depth. In addition they tend to be considered to encourage skin firmness, by natural means lighten skin color, lower spots and boost blood flow towards the skin.

Is a Man’s Skin Really Different?

Is a Man’s Skin Really Different?

man's skin

The skin on a man versus that on a woman is significantly different. The ability to grow a beard is just one obvious distinction among many others that are not so evident. From a structural point of view, some of the differences include skin thickness, collagen density, loss of collagen as we age, texture and hydration. These differences in the skin may in fact create differences in the treatment room. Let’s look at each of these aspects in more detail.

Skin Thickness

We know that the thickness of the skin varies with the location, age and sex of the individual. Additionally, androgens (i.e. testosterone), which cause an increase in skin thickness, accounts for why a man’s skin is about 25 percent thicker than that of a woman’s. A man’s skin also thins gradually with age, whereas the thickness of a woman’s skin remains constant until about the age of fifty. After menopause, her skin will thin significantly, which will continue as she ages.

Collagen Density

Regardless of age, men have a higher collagen density than women; this is the ratio of collagen to the thickness of the skin. Researchers believe that the higher collagen density accounts for why women appear to age faster than men of the same age. When considering intrinsic (genetically-programmed) aging of the skin, it has been said that women are about 15 years older than men of the same age. Of course, the role of daylight exposure in skin aging, combined with the fact that men do not use sunscreen as often as women, may account for why we do not readily notice. Extrinsic aging from UV radiation can add years to a man’s skin and negate the benefit of slower intrinsic aging.

Loss of Collagen

The physical signs of aging in adults, such as wrinkles and laxity to the tissue, are closely related to the collagen content of the skin. Both men and women lose about one percent of their collagen per year after their 30th birthday. For women, however, this escalates significantly in the first five years after menopause then slows down to a loss of two percent per year.

Texture

From a superficial perspective, the texture of a man’s skin is very different than a woman’s. The texture (on a man) is rougher, and the Stratum Corneum is thicker. There is also a difference in the composition of sebum and its production. After puberty, sebum production is greater in males than in females, which is attributed to androgen secretions and accounts for why men have longer lasting acne. The cells in a man’s sebaceous glands have more positive receptors for androgens, which explains why they produce more sebum. Interestingly, redness, proliferation of the sebaceous glands and swelling of the skin on the nose, (a condition known as rhinophyma that is found in extreme cases of rosacea) is only seen in males. It is unknown if this condition is controlled by androgens in a similar capacity as sebum production.

Hydration

Puberty also stimulates the appearance of facial hair in men and gives rise to sweat secretions. Males have more Lactic Acid in their sweat, which accounts for a lower pH (.05 lower) when compared to female sweat. Men also sweat more than twice as much as women and are more prone to sweating, which is stimulated by an increase in body temperature. However, male skin appears to be better hydrated than women’s, which is fortunate, as men are less likely to apply a hydrating moisturizer to their body or face. Perhaps the excess sweating and production of Lactic Acid, a known natural humectant for the skin, is responsible for the level of tissue hydration.

Treating a Man’s Skin

The health of a man’s skin is, of course, just as important as that of a woman. But while treatment for a man sometimes differs from a woman, remember that the same amount of care must be taken regardless of the sex of the client. Even if the man appears to have tough, resilient skin, he may still have internal issues or surround himself in environments that sensitize him. In every instance, use the consultation card to familiarize yourself with the client, and never assume that a man needs any less gentle care than a woman.

What is the Best Face Cream for Men?

What is the Best Face Cream for Men?

First we should ask is a man’s skin really different from a woman’s?

Besides having facial hair, there are structural differences between a man’s skin and a woman’s. Androgen (testosterone) stimulation causes an increase in skin thickness, which accounts for why a man’s skin is about 25% thicker than a woman’s. In addition to being thicker, a man’s skin texture is tougher.Sebum (oil) and its production also differ. After puberty, sebum production is greater in males than females, which is attributed to androgen secretions and accounts for why men have longer lasting acne.Regardless of age, men also have a higher collagen density than women. Because collagen content is directly related to the signs of skin aging, it has been said a woman’s skin is about 15 years older than a man’s of the same age. However, men are less sun savvy than women, meaning they don’t use sunscreens, and could contribute to why the “15 year” skin age difference is not readily noticed. UV damage from the sun can add years to a man’s skin and negate the benefit of slowed intrinsic aging.

What ingredients make up the best face cream for men?

Best Face Cream for Men

When it comes to face moisturizers, the choices are seemingly endless. Drugstores and high-end department stores are packed with creams, moisturizers, serums and more—all promising everything from younger-looking skin to a blemish-free complexion. But what makes one moisturizer different from another? It all comes down to its ingredients.

Packed with any number of substances (and preservatives and additives), not all moisturizers are created equal. Many people rarely check the ingredients label on their beauty products. And it’s no wonder— reading the ingredient list of your favorite beauty product can be downright confusing. It’s usually packed with unpronounceable names that don’t make sense to the common consumer. And opting for the most expensive bottle isn’t your best bet – they may simply contain hard-to-get, but ineffective ingredients. To help you cut through the confusion, we talked to dermatologists to come up with the top five ingredients you should look for in your moisturizer. They’ll help you save face and reveal your softest, smoothest skin yet.

Dimethicone

Best Face Cream for Men

Pronounced “dye-METH-i-kone”, this ingredient may be found in many skin care, makeup and hair care products. Manufacturers use it in moisturizers, primers and foundations because it helps fill in uneven texture and fine lines, creating a smooth, flawless look. “Dimethicone is the main ingredient in most oil-free moisturizers,” says Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. “It’s a light emollient that forms a protective layer over the skin’s surface, helping to hydrate and keep moisture in.” Emollients, like petrolatum, lanolin, and mineral oil, soften and moisturize the skin and can also decrease flaking [Source: WebMD]. They do this by creating an oily layer on top of the skin that traps water.

Petrolatum

If you’ve ever used Vaseline, you’re probably familiar with petrolatum (aka, petroleum jelly). Derived from petroleum (the same kind used for gasoline and other products such as deodorant), petroleum jelly is a staple in many people’s medicine cabinets—and for good reason. It’s great for smoothing and protecting rough skin. “Petrolatum is an occlusive ingredient that prevents water loss and an emollient that hydrates the rough dead cells on the skin’s surface,” says Zeichner. If you have dry skin, be sure to look for petrolatum on a product’s ingredients list. Folks with normal to oily skin may want to skip petrolatum, though, as it may exacerbate greasy skin.

Hyaluronic Acid

Hyaluronic acid has been getting a lot of buzz in the beauty world lately. Because of its ability to plump and soften skin, it’s been showing up in moisturizers and serums over the last few years. Unlike some other skin care ingredients, hyaluronic acid is actually already present in the human body [Source: WebMD]. A viscous, gooey substance, it helps lubricate joints and is even found in the fluid of eyeballs to help maintain their shape [Source: WebMD]. However, like many substances in our bodies, it naturally depletes as we age—which is why beauty product manufacturers have begun adding it to products. “Hyaluronic acid is a humectant that hydrates by drawing water in to the outer layers from deep within the skin,” says Zeichner. In fact, it is said to hold up to 1,000 times its weight in water. As a result, it makes skin appear plumper and feel softer and smoother. That may be why it’s often used as a lip filler in plastic surgery!

Glycerin

Also known as glycerol, glycerin is a humectant that works similarly to hyaluronic acid, says Zeichner. Composed of fats and sugars, it’s a sweet-tasting lipid that’s actually found in all fats, whether they are from animals or vegetables [Source: Paula’s Choice]. Because glycerin is a humectant, it readily absorbs and retains water, keeping skin sooth and hydrated. It attracts water from the environment and from the lower layers of skin (aka, the dermis) adding moisture to the surface layers of skin (the epidermis). In general, it helps maintain the skin’s outer barrier, which helps prevent dryness and flaking. One recent study found that after 10 days of treatment with a cream that was 20 percent glycerin, volunteers saw an increase in corneometer values, a measurement used to measure the hydration levels of your skin [International Journal of Cosmetic Science].

Ceramides

Ceramides are fats naturally found in the skin’s outer layer, and they make up a major component of skin structure. For this reason, they are crucial for maintaining the skin’s natural moisture barrier. “Just like a house is composed of bricks, your skin is made up of cells,” says Zeichner. “Ceramides serve as the mortar between the skin cell ‘bricks’ holding it all together.” In fact, studies have linked dry, damaged skin to low ceramide levels [Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology]. In addition to causing dry, scaly skin, a lack of ceramides makes the skin more susceptible to environmental factors like dirt, pollution and other irritants.

 

So there you have it, that is the best face cream for men.

Wrinkle creams: Your guide to younger looking skin

Wrinkle creams: Your guide to younger looking skin

Do over-the-counter wrinkle creams really reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles? The answer depends on many factors.

wrinkle creams

Many wrinkle creams and lotions sold in department stores, in drugstores and on the Internet promise to reduce wrinkles and prevent or reverse damage caused by the sun.

Do they work? That often depends on the specific ingredients and how long you use them. Because these over-the-counter (nonprescription) wrinkle creams aren’t classified as drugs, they’re not required to undergo scientific research to prove their effectiveness.

If you’re looking for a face-lift in a bottle, you probably won’t find it in over-the-counter wrinkle creams. The benefits of these products are usually only modest at best.

Common ingredients in anti-wrinkle creams

The effectiveness of anti-wrinkle creams depends in part on the active ingredient or ingredients. Here are some common ingredients that may result in slight to modest improvement in the appearance of wrinkles.

  • Retinol. Retinol is a vitamin A compound, the first antioxidant to be widely used in nonprescription wrinkle creams. Antioxidants are substances that neutralize free radicals — unstable oxygen molecules that break down skin cells and cause wrinkles.
  • Vitamin C. Another potent antioxidant, vitamin C may help protect skin from sun damage. Before and between uses, wrinkle creams containing vitamin C must be stored in a way that protects them from air and sunlight.
  • Hydroxy acids. Alpha hydroxy acids, beta hydroxy acids and poly hydroxy acids are exfoliants — substances that remove the upper layer of old, dead skin and stimulate the growth of smooth, evenly pigmented new skin.
  • Coenzyme Q10. This ingredient may help reduce fine wrinkles around the eyes and protect the skin from sun damage.
  • Tea extracts. Green, black and oolong tea contain compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Green tea extracts are the ones most commonly found in wrinkle creams.
  • Grape seed extract. In addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, grape seed extract also promotes wound healing.
  • Niacinamide. A potent antioxidant, this substance is related to Vitamin B-3 (niacin). It helps reduce water loss in the skin and may improve skin elasticity.

 

No guarantees: Assessing safety and effectiveness

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies creams and lotions as cosmetics, which are defined as having no medical value. So the FDA regulates them less strictly than it does drugs. This means that products don’t undergo the same rigorous testing for safety and effectiveness that topically applied medications undergo before approval to go on the market. Regarding this category of creams and lotions, the FDA’s main concern is safety, not effectiveness.

Because the FDA doesn’t evaluate cosmetic products for effectiveness, there’s no guarantee that any over-the-counter product will reduce your wrinkles.

Consider these points when judging the merits of using a wrinkle cream:

  • Cost. Cost has no relationship to effectiveness. A wrinkle cream that’s more costly may not be more effective than a less costly product.
  • Lower doses. Nonprescription wrinkle creams contain lower concentrations of active ingredients than do prescription creams. So results, if any, are limited and usually short-lived.
  • Multiplicity of ingredients. There is no data to suggest that adding two or three of the ingredients above together will be more effective than just one of them.
  • Daily use. You’ll likely need to use the wrinkle cream once or twice a day for many weeks before noticing any improvements. And once you discontinue using the product, your skin is likely to return to its original appearance.
  • Side effects. Some products may cause skin irritation, rashes, burning or redness. Be sure to read and follow the product instructions to limit possible side effects.
  • Individual differences. Just because your friend swears by a product doesn’t mean it will work for you. People have different skin types. No one product works the same for everyone.

Your anti-wrinkle regimen

 wrinkle creams

An anti-wrinkle cream may lessen the appearance of your wrinkles, depending on how often you use it, the type and amount of active ingredient in the wrinkle cream, and the extent of the wrinkles you want to treat.

But if you want to take the guesswork out of your skin care regimen, try these more reliable ways to improve and maintain your skin’s youthful appearance.

  • Protect your skin from the sun. Exposure to UV light speeds up the natural aging process of your skin, causing wrinkles and rough, blotchy skin. In fact, sun exposure is the No. 1 reason for signs of aging in the skin, including uneven pigmentation. Protect your skin — and prevent future wrinkles — by limiting the time you spend in the sun and always wearing protective clothing and a hat. Also, use sunscreen on exposed skin year-round when outdoors, even in winter.
  • Choose products with built-in sunscreen. When selecting skin care products, choose those with a built-in SPF of at least 15. Also, be sure to select products that are broad spectrum, meaning they block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Use moisturizers. Dry skin turns plump skin cells into shriveled ones, creating fine lines and wrinkles. Though moisturizers can’t prevent wrinkles, they can temporarily mask tiny lines and creases.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking causes narrowing of the blood vessels in the outermost layers of your skin. It also damages collagen and elastin — fibers that give your skin its strength and elasticity. As a result, skin begins to sag and wrinkle prematurely.

A dermatologist can help you create a personalized skin care plan by assessing your skin type, evaluating your skin’s condition and recommending products likely to be effective. If you’re looking for more dramatic results, a dermatologist can recommend medical treatments for wrinkles, including prescription creams, botulinum toxin (Botox) injections or skin-resurfacing techniques.

Skin Health First

skin health

“At Last – Fat That You and Your Skin Can Love”

In our society a simple 3-letter word “fat” grew to become a notorious villain. The fact is however, that to live a healthy life and… to show off your beautiful complexion we need to recognize the “good” from the “ugly”. I hope the short story below will help you in this process.

Eating right means diet with no fat – RIGHT? WRONG!

Eating the RIGHT kinds of fat is essential for optimal health as well as good skin tone. Most of our diet is full of too much saturated fat and not enough of the essential fats that we call essential oils. The essential oils are those that promote clear and healthy skin and are also good for your heart.

Saturated and mono-unsaturated fats are not necessary in your diet; the polyunsaturated fats or oils are essential for your health and to maintain youthful, radiant and healthy looking skin.

The polyunsaturated oils provide two essential fats: Omega 6 (linoleic acid) and Omega 3 (alpha-linoleic acid). If these essential fatty acids are processed using heat (as fried and cooked or baked at high temperatures) they change to trans-fats and liberate free radicals which can damage skin and local tissues. These transformed fats are not good for us and interfere with liver metabolism, increase the likelihood of heart disease and inhibit our immune system. So avoid processed or fried foods, which change the structure of these essential fatty acids (EFA).

The body cannot manufacture EFA, so they must be supplied by the diet. EFA are necessary for the proper functioning of all tissues and for tissue repair, especially the skin since the EFAs hold skin cells together in a water tight seal and retain moisture.

The best source of EFA is fish (among the best is salmon and herring) and flaxseeds (linseed). Also a diet high in nuts and seeds, especially walnuts and pumpkin seeds will help to supply the necessary EFAs. Taking Omega 3, as a supplement such as cod-liver oil will help to support the proper function of the brain, vision, facilitate learning and prevent mood swings. These oils also help to control blood cholesterol, improve immunity, reduce inflammation (also in skin), moisten dry skin and support the body’s water metabolism.

Omega 3 (alpha-linoleic acid) is converted by the body into gamma-linoleic acid (GLA) and may then proceed to the pathway responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandins. These prostaglandins keep blood thin (inhibit platelet aggregation), lower blood pressure, aid water metabolism, decrease inflammation, improve nerve and immune function and help to balance blood sugar. This group of fats is present in seeds and their oils. The best source of seed oils are pumpkin, hemp, sunflower, safflower, sesame, corn, walnut, soybean and wheatgerm oil. Evening primrose oil and borage oil are the best-known sources of Gamma-linoleic acid and may be taken as supplements.

Both these two fats Omega 6 and Omega 3 (linoleic and alpha-linoleic acid) are essential for healthy skin since they work together to keep skin smooth and soft and help the cells to retain the appropriate amount of water. Adequate EFAs also help to reduce the dehydrating effects of heat, wind and other environmental factors. If you have a deficiency of EFA the health of your skin deteriorates, the skin becomes dehydrated, itchy, dry and inflamed and you will be more prone to skin infections.

EFAs help wounds to heal more quickly (acne scars), strengthen capillary walls and prevent enlargement of sebaceous glands that in turn may become over active resulting in a higher chance for acne. EFA also help to balance hormones and increase blood flow to the skin.

To ensure an adequate intake of EFA in the diet eat plenty of fish, nuts, seeds and their oils. Have seeds ground up and sprinkled on your salads or into your cereals, even dip your fish or meat into the oil extracts. Make sure the nuts, seeds and oils are stored in air-tight containers to prevent them from turning rancid and producing damaging trans-fats. You may also take an EFA supplement.

USE THE “GOOD FATS” TO FEED YOUR SKIN

EVENING PRIMROSE MASK

This mask nourishes skin and reduces inflammation. It can be used for all skin types but is especially good for dry, skin or acne damaged, scarred and sensitive skin. Evening primrose is rich in gamma linoleic acid and contains all the therapeutic properties of the essential fatty acids; and helps rebalance sebaceous secretions. Use the mask one a week or as desired.

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons all natural, plain yogurt
  • Potato starch
  • 2 capsules of evening primrose oil
  • Water
  • 1 teaspoon of honey (organic if possible)
  • 2 capsules of vitamin E
  • Rosewater (may be bought in natural food stores as rosehydrolat). This is to be used after the mask

Open the capsules of evening primrose and vitamin E and place the oils in a bowl. Add all the other ingredients except the rosewater. Add enough water to make a good mask consistency. The paste should be the consistency of chocolate icing on a cake, easy to spread but not “leaky”. Apply the mask to a clean face and neck and leave to absorb for 20 minutes. Relax.

Rinse off with warm water and pat-dry delicately preferably with a cotton towel. Finish by toning your skin with light floral water such as rosewater. Discard any remaining mask and make a fresh batch for each treatment.

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